Why Does the C of E Exist?

Writing in The Spectator, Rod Liddle asks the question, “why does the Church of England exist?” in his piece “The C of E Has Forgotten Its Purpose.” With constant capitulation to the pressures of the politically correct wasteland that Britain has become, the C of E no longer has a voice, spiritual or otherwise. This is a particularly stinging critique, one that is worth reading. But don’t think that Liddle is on a tirade against religion in general, or all Anglicans. His point is that the leaders, in particular Rowan Williams, have lost all credibility both in the eyes of the church and in the eyes of the British in general.

[HT: Carl Trueman]

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1 Comment

Filed under anglicanism

One response to “Why Does the C of E Exist?

  1. The Church of England — to be distinguished from the bodies which make up the Worldwide Anglican Communion, although a great many of these are in equally bad or worse condition — seems to have become another dead State Church, like that of Scotland, Denmark, Norway, and what have you. The British Anglican may find a vibrant, conservative Evangelical or Anglo-Catholic parish, but these rarities nowadays are in a position of rebellion against the traditional authorities of the greater Church. He can no longer look to the bishops as spiritual leaders.

    Regarding the Anglican Communion, one positive development is that many individual parishes are cutting ties with their national denominations (like the Anglican Church of Canada, the U.S. Episcopal Church) and joining up with conservative Evangelical Anglican bodies like the Anglican Province of the Southern Cone. This allows them, for the time being, to be faithful to the Bible (by not being a member of a body which no longer does, avoiding their sanctions and whatnot) and still be a part of the Anglican Communion (which nonetheless entails practical autonomy from the C of E). I respect that. While my instinct would be for flight — “to hell with it” — remaining within the arena to fight is, I think, a virtuous act. It’s their Communion too.

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