Monthly Archives: March 2006

Anablepo – Gems from Thomas Manton

My friend Crawford at Anablepo has posted a recent find. He stumbled across a document of sayings by the great Puritan Thomas Manton. Check out his blog for a modernised reading of some of them, they really are quite fabulous.
Some of the quotes I most enjoyed are:

33. It is very unwarrantable to gain men to a party before they be gained to God.

45. Conquer will, and you conquer hell. The principal point in difference between God and sinners is whose will shall stand, his or theirs.

47. The more low and useless we are in our own eyes, the fitter we are to be employed by God, who poureth the oil of his grace into broken vessels.

Maybe Crawford will edit these and have them printed in a booklet? That would be an encouragement to the church!

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Conference

Tomorrow Toronto Baptist Seminary will be hosting a conference marking the anniversary of the death of Thomas Cranmer (1489-1556). Our guest speaker will be Mr. Robert Zins of A Christian Witness to Roman Catholics. He will give two talks on how to evangelise Roman Catholics. TBS’ principal Dr. Michael Haykin will also give a talk on the life and legacy of Cranmer.
The event is only $15. There will also be a fabulous book sale that will include a clearing out of our bookroom with everything priced at 75% off! As well, Sola Scriptura Ministries will be there with their own book table.
It’s sure to be a great day. Hope to see you there!

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Third Avenue Blog

Here is the blog of Third Avenue Baptist Church in Louisville, KY. It is intended for the congregation, but the stuff on there is pretty good, so I thought I would share it. Aaron Menikoff sent it to me, who is a pastor there. I consider him my Southern counterpart, as he is Dr. Haykin’s assistant at Southern Seminary. A doppleganger of sorts.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Jesu Joy of Man’s Desiring

Happy Birthday to that great musical Reformer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750). It would have been his 321st birthday today. If he lived in Old Testament times, he may have lived long enough to celebrate it.

SDG

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Pilgrim Baptist Fellowship Conference

From Kirk at Redeeming the Time:

PBF Spring Conference

Here is another reminder of the spring conference being hosted by Pilgrim Baptist Fellowship.

Date: April 1st

Location: Hamilton District Christian High School

Guest Speaker: Dr. Glendon Thompson

Conference Schedule

9:00 AM – Arrival

9:30-10:30 – Dr. Thompson: The Da Vinci Code: A Critical Assessment of Its Religious-Historical Claims

10:30-11:00 – Coffee Break

11:00-12:00 – Kirk Wellum: How Did We Get Our Bibles

12:00-1:00 – Lunch (Provided)

1:00-2:00 – Dr.Thompson: Exposing the Visera: The Broader Thematic Considerations of the Da Vinci Code

2:00-2:30 – Question and Answer Session

The conference is free but we would like you to register in advance so we can make proper preparations for lunch. To register please call 905-304-0133 or email me at kwellum@gmail.com.

Thanks

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

David Bahnsen on Protectionism

David Bahnsen, the son of one of my heroes, Greg Bahnsen, has written a piece on the port deal. I’m not sure where I stand on the issue (I’m not a Yank, so I guess it matters little), but it is quite apparent where David stands! The language is a little strong for my tastes, but he gets his point across.
Here’s a quote:
I plead with those free market thinkers on the Hill to wake up. We need these anti-market, anti-trade dinosaurs to be robbed of any influence or power. The ramifications are huge. A more exhaustive treatise on the real life situations happening right now regarding this very issue (the assault on the oil companies, the tax of a “windfall profit” tax, the stifling of trade with other nations, the threatening of nations who generously peg their currency to our greenback, the demonization of companies who lower labor costs by utilizing overseas talent, etc.). For now, I will just simply say that the problems are real, they are not talked about enough, and this is one of the very few issues in our nation that I actually believe represent bipartisan dimentia.

Leave a comment

Filed under capitalism, economics, greg bahnsen, politics

Carl Trueman on John Owen

Another Carl Trueman post. This time it is a link to his lectures on the great Puritan John Owen. Click the above link to go to the site and download them.
You know what I’ll be listening to today!

As a matter of trivia, John Owen was chancellor of Christ Church, Oxford; he taught John Locke and was a chaplain for Oliver Cromwell. For more on Owen go here.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Alexander Carson (1776-1844) on Free Grace

“No conditions on the part of the sinner can exist in a free salvation. It is of faith that it might be by grace. The pride of man is humbled in the doctrine of the cross. The virtuous sage is able to offer to God, for his salvation, nothing more than the abandoned profligate. If they believe the Gospel, they both alike are changed by its power: they repent, are born again, and perform good works.”

[Alexander Carson, Works I (New York: Hanna & Carson, 1852), 198]

Leave a comment

Filed under alexander carson, baptists, grace, quotes

Adventures in Bowling Green – Libertarianism 101

Peter Jaworski has a very helpful blog-post for those who are seeking an understanding of what it means to be libertarian. He explains that being a libertarian is more about the that rather than the why.
Question: where do issues of human nature come in. Or better, where does the “why” come in?

[HT: Blogging Tories]

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Crux Sale!

Inventory Reduction Sale
50-90% off retail prices
Hundreds of books at great savings

Tuesday, March 21- Saturday, March 25, 2006

Crux Books is located in Wycliffe College, across from Trinity College
5 Hoskin Ave
Toronto, ON.
M5S 1H7
416-599-2749
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 10 am – 7 pm, Sat. 11 am – 5 pm

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Authentic Libertarians and Gary North’s Pistol

Still on the Libertarian track (you can tell where my mind is), so I thought I’d post this by Gary North over at Lew Rockwell’s site.
If you don’t agree, at least you’ll laugh.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Paul Johnson – Intellectuals

Just thought I’d link to a post I did sharing some thoughts on Paul Johnson’s excellent book Intellectuals. Check it out here.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Hmmmmm…Libertarianism and Law

There’s been more posting in the last hour than in the last month! But, well…I have no excuse, I should be doing homework right now.
But, I thought this was important. After the Liberty Seminar I attended on Saturday, I concluded that it was alright for me to consider myself as a Libertarian. I’ve been enjoying Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom, so that must mean something right??
Then I read this.
Now I’m back to the problems I’ve been mulling over in my mind since I first got into Libertarianism back in Septembre. Should Steve Kubby be allowed to grow marijuana? As an ethical standard, drawn from experience and from Biblical law, I am against any form of drug use. In what measure can I be a Libertarian without compromising my Christian worldview?
I’m sure there’ll be more such posts in the near and distant future. For now, the patristic era is calling…

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Liberty Pics


The Freedom Project has posted pictures from Saturday’s Windsor Liberty Seminar. Although my mug didn’t make the cut, it’s still worth checking out. ;)
I’ve been hacking away at my lap-top writing out my thoughts on the Seminar in more detail. They should be up soon.
The above pic is of the breakout session that I attended led by Peter Jaworski (pictured far left). As I mentioned previously, it was a very helpful group. In fact, the girl pictured second from the right vocalised a number of questions that I and my friend Keith were thinking. I’ll try and post on those specifically later on as well.
I’m very interested in the relationship between libertarianism and the Christian worldview. I was reading Bastiat’s The Law last night and was struck at how Biblical it appeared.
Anyways, go check out the other pics from their site. I’m glad Matt Bufton didn’t post one of me digging for gold in my ear, my wife wouldn’t have liked that on the web! (Hey Matt, if you read this, you went to school with my wife and her sister. Vicky and Corinne Rixon. Weird eh?).
***UPDATE***
It appears that The Windsor Star published an article on the Seminar. Blue Blogging Soapbox posted it so that we of the un-subscribed could check it out. I am utterly blown away at this article – what a joke. It makes the seminar look like a love-in for haters of the poor! Dale Molnar has done us a real service by proving Lydia Miljan’s point: that the media is disgustingly biased. For all those at the Seminar who weren’t convinced of Miljan’s lecture, they surely are now.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Is the Reformation Over?

If you go to the 9 Marks site you’ll see that this month’s interview is with Carl Trueman, professor of historical theology at Westminster Seminary (PA). They are discussing the historical issues brought up by Mark Noll, who recently moved to the University of Notre Dame. The question posed for discussion: “Is the Reformation Over?” the title of Noll’s recent book.
I haven’t had the chance to listen to the interview, but having listened to Dr. Trueman a number of times and having profited from his various writings (ie. books, articles, editorials and of course blogs), and I don’t doubt that between the interviewer Mark Dever and Trueman, it should prove to be both intellectually challenging and hilarious.
I should take this opportunity to remind the vast amount of readers at this blog (ahem) that Carl Trueman will be speaking for the Edwards Centre on May 26-27, 2006. He’ll be speaking on spirituality and the Reformed confessions. Primarily he’ll deal with spirituality in the Puritan era. As Trueman is a John Owen expert, I don’t doubt that there’ll be a heavy dose of learnin’ from one of Cromwell’s great chaplains.
I would also recommend that everyone check out Carl Trueman’s recent Wages of Spin column at Reformation21 called “Freedom and Protest,” as usual, it’s brilliant. In it he writes about freedom in relation to the recent furor over the so-called “Cartoon Jihad.” Here’s a good quote:
And the embarrassing failure of governments, from Washington to Rome, to offer robust support of press freedom in this case speaks for itself. When there are Iranian politicians who deny the Holocaust, and when there are Arab media who republish The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, Western politicians should have priorities other than pandering to those enraged by a few satirical cartoons.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Ronald Nash Dies

Wow, Ronald Nash has passed on to be with the Lord. That comes as quite a shock.
I have benefited greatly from Dr. Nash’s writings, I’m sorry that he won’t be with us to continue his great work for the Christian faith.

Read Russ Moore’s thoughts on Dr. Nash’s passing here.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Windsor Liberty Seminar Report

My time is constrained today, so I’ll have to keep this post short. Thankfully I’m a relatively fast typist, so I have a higher rate of production in a shorter period of time (yeah, that was lame).
On Saturday I went with two of my friends from Windsor to the Windsor Liberty Seminar held by the Freedom Group and sponsored by The Institute for Humane Studies. I wasn’t sure what to expect when I signed up for it a few months ago, but I wad delightfully surprised at how excellent it was.
I want to blog more about the day and if I get the chance I will later on. I will make a few comments about what I liked. The strengths of the seminar were both important: the speakers and the breakout sessions. All of the speakers were highly qualified to speak on their topics, they communicated clearly and in an engaging way. I can honestly say that I learned a lot about libertarianism and feel much more comfortable in generalising myself as one (with certain qualifications of course!). I thought that Stephen Horowitz was particularly good in dispelling the three oft heard economic myths such as the gap between the rich and poor and women are discriminated against in the work-force. I really want to blog about his lecture soon, it was very helpful. Gerry Nicholls from the National Citizen’s Coalition was also very good.
The breakout sessions were just as profitable as the speakers (at least my group was!). After each session those in attendance would break into three groups to discuss the previous session. Our’s was led by Peter Jaworski who was very effective in keeping the topic grounded, making sure that everyone had a say and that everyone felt that their opinions mattered.
Matt Bufton, who organized the event, was also very helpful in creating an open atmosphere where, at least for myself, we all felt welcome.
I’m looking forward to other sessions that involve these people. I think that a movement towards classical liberalism is very important. Trudeau-socialism has wreaked havoc in Canada. We need a greater voice for freedom, and I think that those involved with the Freedom Group will help provide an important foundation towards that end.
With that said, it’s time to go back to work!

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

"I’ll believe in God when 1 and 1 is 5"

In highschool I got into punk rock. It was a bit of a switch from listening to bands like Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd, but when I was converted to Christ, I ditched all the hippie music I used to listen to when stoned (consequently I’m back to granola rock, but that’s another story). The switch came primarily through the influence of some friends who were into bands like The Misfits, Minor Threat, Black Flag, etc. The more we got into the movment, the more our interests in punk rock evolved. One band that I really enjoyed was Bad Religion, headed up by Greg Graffin. They were a perfect blend between the old skool punk like Minor Threat and the more new skool like Face to Face, NOFX or No Use For A Name. Like much of the punk from that era, it was more than just a bunch of guys running around screaming about nothing. Bands like Bad Religion had an ideology that they held tenaciously to and it oozed through their music.
Particularly for Graffin and Bad Religion, they were devoutly atheistic. Knowing Graffin’s background it makes sense (well, not really, atheism makes no sense) that he was an atheist as he has his PhD in zoology and has been heavily influenced by naturalism.
Songs like “God Song” reveal a deep-seated antagonism to Christianity, as can be seen from its lyrics:

and did those feet in ancient times trod on america’s pastuers of
green? and did that anthropocentric god wane with their thoughts and
beliefs all unseen? i don’t think so, he’s up there with the others
laying low, vying with those who you’ve traded your life to to bless
your soul, and have they told you how to think, cleansed your mind of
sepsis and automony? or have you escaped scrutiny, and regaled
yourself with depravity? now we all see, “religion is just synthetic
frippery, unnecessary in our expanding global cultural efficiency” and
don’t you fear this impasse we have built to our future? ever so near,
and oh so austere

I listened to Bad Religion quite a bit, saw them in concert and even wore a number of their shirts; all the while professing faith in Christ. Finally, the point came when I realised that having lyrics like, “I’ll believe in God when one and one is five,” running through my head daily wasn’t exactly edifying. Slowly I fazed them out, and I don’t think that I’ve listened to them in over five years.
Anyways, I just found out that Greg Graffin is co-authoring a book to be published by IVP called Is Belief in God Good, Bad or Irrelevant? A Professor and a Punk Rocker Discuss Science, Religion, Naturalism and Christianity with a Christian guy I’ve never heard of named Preston Jones. It definitely looks like an interesting book, one that I plan to get when it comes out. Maybe I’ll listen to some Bad Religion to get myself stoked.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

It’s Been So Long

The past few weeks have been so busy that I haven’t had the time to blog. Even this post will have to be brief.
What’s been keeping me busy? Primarily school. I had a twelve page report to do on Ivor Davidson’s The Birth of the Church, one of the excellent texts for my early church history class. We’ve also worked our way through Tertullian and Cyprian of Carthage lately for homework.
I’m in the process of finishing a paper on the Sabbath rest found in Hebrews 3:7-4:11 which has been a great study. It’s only supposed to be six pages, and being so verbose, I’ve had a hard time keeping it short. The paper has been scrapped three times thus far, but I’m on the brink of completion! I swear!
I’ve also been plodding through Greek translation which has actually been encouraging (surprise surprise). When you actually get it, Greek isn’t so hard. It really takes discipline though. In class yesterday I was very happy to read along in 1 John and not get stuck (I know, easy for all you Greek scholars, but hey, it was a feat for me!).
I’m also in the process of writing a brief piece on Alexander Carson as an Irish Reformer for Irish-Reformation, a piece on why Christians need to study Church History for The Evangelical Baptist, a review of Jim Elliff’s Wasted Faith; a review of Heloise & Abelard (just starting); a review of John Byl’s Divine Challenge; phew! Too much stuff!!
Tomorrow is the Windsor Liberty Seminar at the University of Windsor, so Vicky and I are going back home for the weekend. I’m looking forward to this seminar – as a good ole free marketeer, I’m sure I’ll be in my element. I recently picked up a copy of Friederich A. Hayek’s Road to Serfdom which looks awesome. It’s been my before-bed reading. I’m all about thinking socialism and fascism are the coterminous for totalitarianism! :) Sorry to all you socialists out there.
Anyways, work beckons, so I must depart. I just thought I’d give an update on my whereabouts.
Oh yeah, and The Band rocks – we must not forget! (I’m listening to them as I type).

1 Comment

Filed under alexander carson, f a hayek, liberty, windsor

Paul Johnson on History

“The study of history is a powerful antidote to contemporary arrogance. It is humbling to discover how many of our glib assumptions, which seem to us novel and plausible, have been tested before, not once but many times and in innumerable guises; and discovered to be, at great human cost, wholly false.”

[Paul Johnson, The Quotable Paul Johnson: A Topical Compilation of His Wit, Wisdom and Satire ed. George J. Marlin (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1994), 138 from Thomas Sowell, “Favorite Quotation” http://www.tsowell.com/quotes.html]

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized